Animating?

  • #30, by esmeraldaSaturday, 18. February 2017, 15:32 4 years ago
    Rigging 2D-characters works similar to rigging in 3D. You assign an image to a bone and move the bone to animate. You can scale, rotate, but it works best in sideview because of the missing 3D.
    In most programms like spriter or dragonbones you can use bitmap-images or other formats like png. In dragonbones (and spine pro, I think) you can tranform this image to a mesh and deform this mesh.
    What art style you use (like scribbled characters) is up to you.

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  • #31, by MachtnixSaturday, 18. February 2017, 15:33 4 years ago
    If you want to draw frame by frame old-school-way (well, not on paper) you could always use pencil 2D. It's open source.

    I once tried to draw animations on paper and scan them, but it was too hard to align them correctly. There were always odd jumps in the animation. (but I'm very sloppy when I draw, so maby you won't have the same problem.) After that I bought a cheap grafik tablet :-)
    Thank you for the link. I will have a look.

    Yeah, I bought a cheap tablet too, but it isn't a real progress for me. I don't use it. The problem is: it isn't good enough to translate my pencil pressure into adequate line thickness. It has only four or five "pressure values", so I only can really draw some standard lines. I tried some pencils.
    The second problem is: I can't see what I draw on the tablet. I have to look at the screen, it's the abnormal way to draw. It's like drawing with a mouse. No advantage. The true advantage is TO SEE what you make... And this advantage costs 1000 Euro (yeah, the very best WACOM with colour surface...). Too expensive.

    Using paper you need the stuff to put papers exactly together (Rundloch-Langloch-Stifte). I lost them, shit.

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  • #32, by esmeraldaSaturday, 18. February 2017, 15:47 4 years ago
    Yeah, I bought a cheap tablet too, but it isn't a real progress for me. I don't use it. The problem is: it isn't good enough to translate my pencil pressure into adequate line thickness. It has only four or five "pressure values", so I only can really draw some standard lines. I tried some pencils.
    The second problem is: I can't see what I draw on the tablet. I have to look at the screen, it's the abnormal way to draw. It's like drawing with a mouse. No advantage. The true advantage is TO SEE what you make... And this advantage costs 1000 Euro (yeah, the very best WACOM with colour surface...). Too expensive.
    In most drawing software you can adjust the pressure sensibilty. But I agree, looking on the screen while drawing on the board feels awkward. It takes quite some time getting used to it.
    There are some Cintiq-rip-offs for about 400 EUR (like Huion GT), but still too expensive for me.

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  • #33, by MachtnixSaturday, 18. February 2017, 15:50 4 years ago
    @Machtnix: yes, I meant that most native English people write bad. Bad spelling. Bad grammar. They often use slang words & mobile shorthand instead of typing out full words, which makes it hard - even for me - to understand what they are trying to say.
    A German native write also bad *lol*

    Because I'm a German story teller I want to use a correct and well sounding language with fitting words. The final sentence is in my mind. But I can't write a good German AND a good English. They are too different. If I write in English I often have to change the way I want to say something. The German way to tell doesn't work. Both languages have their own "music" and structure.  Most of my English is only to "feel" if the text sounds like an English text (checking S-P-O, adverbs and adjectives,...).



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  • #34, by MachtnixSaturday, 18. February 2017, 16:18 4 years ago
    In most drawing software you can adjust the pressure sensibilty. But I agree, looking on the screen while drawing on the board feels awkward. It takes quite some time getting used to it.
    There are some Cintiq-rip-offs for about 400 EUR (like Huion GT), but still too expensive for me.
    That's correct, but it wasn't much fine to adjust. To make a pencil drawing you need a very good tablet.


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  • #35, by afrlmeSaturday, 18. February 2017, 16:20 4 years ago
    @Machtnix: yes, I meant that most native English people write bad. Bad spelling. Bad grammar. They often use slang words & mobile shorthand instead of typing out full words, which makes it hard - even for me - to understand what they are trying to say.
    A German native write also bad *lol*

    Because I'm a German story teller I want to use a correct and well sounding language with fitting words. The final sentence is in my mind. But I can't write a good German AND a good English. They are too different. If I write in English I often have to change the way I want to say something. The German way to tell doesn't work. Both languages have their own "music" and structure.  Most of my English is only to "feel" if the text sounds like an English text (checking S-P-O, adverbs and adjectives,...).



    For me story-telling is not always about using correct language. Often stories benefit from words being written so that they are sounded out like they would sound if spoken aloud. Irvine Welsh, the author of Trainspotting would be a good example as he often writes dialog as it would sound when spoken aloud, while typing out correct English for the non-dialog / inner-thought parts of his novels. I like it, though it does make it hard to understand at times for me as I'm not familiar with all the different Scottish slang / dialect.

    Where I am from in the UK, we speak what is called broad Yorkshire (I guess equivalent would be farmer speak). Depending on which town/region we are from, we use different words, terms & accents. About 10 minutes from where I am from is a place called Barnsley. I swear they are speaking a foreign language most of the time, then of course you have certain parts of Wales & Scotland where they still speak Gaelic or whatever it is called as their primary language.

    Those cintiq things look nice. Very expensive though. Think about €2000 or something for 22" model? I used to own a basic Wacom Bamboo One. I found it really hard to use because it was only A5 size & it didn't feel very natural looking at your monitor instead of your hand while drawing/writing. I never got used to it & in the end I swapped it to mouse mode & just used it as a more precise & larger touchpad.

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  • #36, by ArtNovaSaturday, 18. February 2017, 16:55 4 years ago
    I thought Bamboo is a bad tablet for digital painting, thus I bought Intuos, medium model. You know what? Im not good in painting for now and I dont felt difference except size. My old Bamboo small was even more comfortable.
    And then I meet one guy, who done just miracle things with small Bamboo like my own. And he told me, that even this model is more than enough.
    So, sure thing, Cintique is great (I know another person, who owns it and who bad in painting, its nearly useless for him), but its all about practice and patience I think. And practicing traditional drawing/painting also.
    If one person can do it, any person can do it.

    P.S.: Have no problem with google-translating any language. But meaning of many words is loosing very often. Sometimes even become opposite.

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  • #37, by ArtNovaSaturday, 18. February 2017, 17:09 4 years ago
    Btw, here is one great guy, who shows his painting hardware rig in this video. He using some gamepad also to boost his speed.
    Look it at 14:23

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  • #38, by MachtnixSaturday, 18. February 2017, 17:33 4 years ago
    Hey, it's from Ralph Bakshi "Wizards"?

    It's an old discussion: a genius don't need the most expensive tools, but it helps. An expensive tool doesn't help bad artists getting better. I have drawn (is that the correct tense?) on paper for more than 30 years - I don't like watching on the screen while my hand does something on the table... And as an artist you have to know your handicraft. I think the guy learned to draw with bamboo and so it's the best for him.

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  • #39, by ManiMansonSaturday, 18. February 2017, 17:41 4 years ago
    https://brashmonkey.com/

    Really simples tool.

    Tolles Program und relativ bediener freundlich. Für low.

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  • #40, by GlenfxSaturday, 18. February 2017, 18:15 4 years ago
    About 6 months ago I suggested the use of Dragonbones since it has the same capabilities as spine pro with a $0 price tag, but the JSOM format it exports is not recognized by visionaire.

    It would be cool if compatibility would be implemented since it would be a really great addition as is not a difficult program to use.

    I made this with it to test the mesh deformation and bones hehe.
    http://axigan.deviantart.com/art/Joyful-Heart-animated-62999...

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