Real-time system

  • #1, by evgenySaturday, 22. May, 16:59 3 weeks ago
    Hello everyone, is it possible to implement a real-time system similar "The  Last Express"? I understand this to mean that different events are tied to different times. If the player is not in the right place, then he may miss something important. I didn't find this information in simple tutorials, so I write here. How difficult is this task? Is it possible to do with visual programming? I will be glad to have any explanations.

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  • #2, by afrlmeSaturday, 22. May, 20:27 3 weeks ago
    By real time, do you mean time passed in the game, or current local time of the person playing your game?

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  • #3, by evgenySaturday, 22. May, 22:34 3 weeks ago
    By real time, do you mean time passed in the game, or current local time of the person playing your game?
    First, of course.

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  • #4, by afrlmeSaturday, 22. May, 23:07 3 weeks ago
    Create a value somewhere & call it playtime - maybe on your playable character. Also create a called by other action block type, rename to something like "update_playtime" & add something along the lines of this inside of it...

    1. pause for 1000ms
    2. value "playtime" + 1
    3. jump to action part #1


    Now inside of each scene create an at begin of scene action (if you don't already have one) & call the called by other action block you created earlier. Next create an at end of scene action block for each scene (again if you don't already have any created) & quit the called by other action block you created earlier.

    The idea behind this is that the value will increment by 1 every second that passes whilever a scene is shown. If you don't call the action block in menu type scenes then the time won't increase.

    Anyway, ages ago I wrote some functions for converting seconds into dd:hh:mm:ss, etc format. You can find them  here.

    Using what I've just said, you should be able to query the amount of time passed in the game & use it to update conditions &/or values as needed to determine what should happen in the game. As long as you combine it with conditions, values, & if queries you should be able to control the narrative of the game - though to be honest (I looked up "the last express" to get a better understanding of what you were wanting to achieve) & all I can say is good luck. Non-linear storytelling is quite complicated & requires a lot of work. Having said that, I do really enjoy non-linear story games.

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  • #5, by evgenySunday, 23. May, 00:39 3 weeks ago
    Thank you for the detailed answer. Now I have a better understanding of which way to go. I thought it would be a difficult task, but I didn't think I would have to step into completely uncharted territory.

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  • #6, by afrlmeSunday, 23. May, 12:44 3 weeks ago
    Thank you for the detailed answer. Now I have a better understanding of which way to go. I thought it would be a difficult task, but I didn't think I would have to step into completely uncharted territory.

    It is a complicated mechanic. Just recording the playtime of the player is simple, but using that playtime to control the narrative of a non-linear game world is complicated.

    Non-linear games are often complicated because they require a lot more conditions, values, & if queries than your standard linear game - especially if the actions the player takes or does not take in the game affect the game world & how the story progresses.

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