Leisure Suit Larry Reloaded + Unity engine

  • #1, by GlenfxThursday, 14. November 2013, 10:41 7 years ago
    I recently played the alpha demo of the space venture game and felt kind of disappointed of it and thought the engine (Unity) might be hurting the gameplay, then i thought about playing Leisure Suit Larry Reloaded since I didn't play it since it came out, but i noted the same load screen setup appeared, so i realized it was completely done in Unity as well which was quite a find for me.

    I think the game is quite nice, smooth and very responsive, but i found it quite cool that it works so well and they made it in quite a short time frame, so it left me thinking about the possibilities Unity has to build 2D adventure games.

    So i think It would only be a matter of building a nice step by step tutorial for us non coders to be able to build 2D adventure games with Unity grin.

    Newbie

    71 Posts


  • #2, by afrlmeThursday, 14. November 2013, 12:08 7 years ago
    I don't think it will be as simple as that...
    But I guess you could sure as hell try! wink

    I think unity requires the user/developer to have - somewhat of - a grasp on c# language (I think?) as they need to manually create functions & controls etc for their games, which, I assume, could be pretty bloody time consuming! razz

    Only thing I really know about unity is that pretty much any game made in it, seems to need a fair bit of juice to run it; no matter how small/simple the game is.

    Imperator

    6846 Posts

  • #3, by derOesiThursday, 14. November 2013, 12:45 7 years ago
    there are lots of plugins which help with almost all issues/problems of an adventure in unity... playmaker, 2dtoolkit come to mind.... playmaker(which includes a pathfinder) seems to be a slightly more complicated but (from the look of it) also more complex version of the VIS actionsystem...

    but sure as hell, its not as easy as VIS at all.....

    to be totally honest i'm thinking about building my game in unity (mainly for flexibility (object in hierarchies, ability to add stuff as 3d assets (which can save a lot of vram as well), and overall platform and performance reasons..)

    but i think to release something properly with unity, you still need a "true" programmer which handles some of the groundwork (at the beginning) and some of the stuff at the end (installer, steam/ios store stuff)..
    (the community is enormous though, so it should be possible to find a gun for hire to do this stuff... )

    Newbie

    48 Posts

  • #4, by NigecThursday, 14. November 2013, 15:17 7 years ago
    I've heard the most recent update has more features and fixes geared towards 2D games..
    There is a guy doing a 2D engine called AGE which uses the Unity core, I got his game working on a Kindle

    I've been dabbling with C# recently and I quite like it

    Key Killer

    566 Posts

  • #5, by RoccoFriday, 15. November 2013, 22:38 7 years ago
    This is exactly what you are looking for i guess: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/#/content/11896

    If you check it out, please keep us informed how it works. smile

    Newbie

    0 Posts

  • #6, by GlenfxSaturday, 16. November 2013, 02:43 7 years ago
    @AFRLMe: i don't think unity needs that much of power, all games i played in my android (inexpensive end) tablet run great, even the pc web based games run really smooth.

    @derOesi: yeah, i played with playmaker and didn't feel it was the right tool for me either, i want to make 3D adventure games kind of like telltale's sam & max with simpler (artist friendly) interactivity and support for a wide range of devices. So Unity might be the only good choice for now since visionaire (which i love) has fallen into the extremely slow development abyss.

    @Nigec: yeah, i was looking at the 2D support on unity too, i also found the AGE engine though I think Visionaire is far better than that one (unless i was looking at something else hehe).

    @ Rocco: Woooooooooow, wow, now THAT is what i always dreamed of for unity, i played some time ago with playmaker and still didn't understand much of how it worked, it was kind of a pain to make a point-click solution and the end result was kind of buggy and messy.

    I do see me playing with the adventure creator plugin in a few months, thank you very much for the link.

    Newbie

    71 Posts

  • #7, by BigStansSaturday, 16. November 2013, 04:34 7 years ago
    First thing…
    Are Leisure Suit Larry Reloaded does made fun?
    I give this 60%. All older titles are funnier.

    I know unity and i know Visionaire smile 2 Different concept's.
    We want to be an easy using 2D (later 2.5D) engine.
    Unity have few issues also! If i would make an game in 3D commercial game really did not choose unity. I choose the UDK or ogre!

    Sure, that Visionaire was completely different from all others wink
    Made an game without programming knowledge, but with an very high customizable "Lua Scripting" (if needed)
    on each platform/device. I think we are the first one, which do that smile

    Great Poster

    361 Posts

  • #8, by GlenfxSaturday, 16. November 2013, 07:35 7 years ago
    Hey BigStans, no i haven't enjoyed Leisure Suit Larry Reloaded, but i never enjoyed the original first game either, if they manage to kickstart another of larry's games I might consider helping them for the third and fifth games which i did enjoy. On the other hand, i think the remake is quite well done.

    I know Visionaire and Unity are two different engines, though Unity has put a lot of effort into making the engine friendlier and better, it also supports pluggins made by users that expand its features and help by making certain things with ease, like the adventure creator kit mentioned before which makes the engine work quite close to how visionaire works, and you can export to a wide range of devices which is a huge plus.

    I remember Ogre being a render engine not a game engine and UDK would require a hefty license fee for commercial work and needs far more coding to be done and i would think it's intended for big studios, though i don't know if it's suitable for adventure games created by really small teams.

    It's unfortunate that Visionaire is kind of a hobby engine, i love it so much but the updates and features are years apart, and it's kind of sad to read from one of the developers saying the games made with it have a small market and that is a reason why development is kind of a hobby. roll

    Newbie

    71 Posts

  • #9, by afrlmeSaturday, 16. November 2013, 15:18 7 years ago
    Hey BigStans, no i haven't enjoyed Leisure Suit Larry Reloaded, but i never enjoyed the original first game either, if they manage to kickstart another of larry's games I might consider helping them for the third and fifth games which i did enjoy. On the other hand, i think the remake is quite well done.

    I know Visionaire and Unity are two different engines, though Unity has put a lot of effort into making the engine friendlier and better, it also supports pluggins made by users that expand its features and help by making certain things with ease, like the adventure creator kit mentioned before which makes the engine work quite close to how visionaire works, and you can export to a wide range of devices which is a huge plus.

    I remember Ogre being a render engine not a game engine and UDK would require a hefty license fee for commercial work and needs far more coding to be done and i would think it's intended for big studios, though i don't know if it's suitable for adventure games created by really small teams.

    It's unfortunate that Visionaire is kind of a hobby engine, i love it so much but the updates and features are years apart, and it's kind of sad to read from one of the developers saying the games made with it have a small market and that is a reason why development is kind of a hobby. roll


    I'm not so sure about small market these days? Adventure/puzzle games seem to be, becoming increasingly popular, all the time & with the help of kickstarter giving some of the old pioneers of adventure games a chance to make more p+c games, which tell tale & daedalic have already been doing a grand job of making them quite popular to a much less nostalgic, younger crowd (nostalgic, being us old farts), which in turn has led to some of the old classic games of the 90's being played again or revitalized on platforms such as nintendo ds; for example smile

    Also I think the (re-)introduction of complex & flexible narrative choices (as seen in: walking dead, for example), which allow the player to change & adapt the world & storyline through actions & dialog choices is a huge step forward for adventure games. Having said that, I realize that we used to have games like that back in the 80's, albeit, they were text only based games razz Most adventure games up until recently have mostly been very linear, with wacky puzzles, deep pockets & crazy story lines.

    it would be nice if VS had a few more developers, to speed up the time between updates & a bit of a marketing brainstorm session on how to make some paper to pay said additional developers; either that or find some more developers who are willing to work pro-bono.

    udk is free for non-commercial (freeware) games, then it ranges from $99 upwards. I think $99 & 25% of game/project sales or something?
    https://www.unrealengine.com/udk/licensing/purchase/#Terms

    Imperator

    6846 Posts

  • #10, by wrongtargetSaturday, 16. November 2013, 18:15 7 years ago
    I'm both a Unity and Visionaire Studio user.
    If used in the correct way and investing the right amount of resources and time (which in some cases can be a lot), Unity can 't limit the gameplay.
    The thing is that to make a 2D game in Unity you had to go for some workarounds that were a little consuming, but the engine is insanely flexible and if you don't limit yourself to the scripts online and actually have a good coder and artist with you, the posibilities are endless.
    It is, of course, much more complicated to use than Visionaire Studio.
    Unity just released it's 4.3 update a few days ago that focus in new 2D tools (which I have not yet used). It apparently streamlines the process much more.

    I don't know why @Von Bigstans doesn't recommend Unity for commercial games.
    i found that outrageous. I would recommend it as much as Visionaire.

    Newbie

    1 Posts

  • #11, by SimonSSaturday, 16. November 2013, 22:29 7 years ago
    David and I doesn't recommend Unity for big games because of what we see at Daedalic's Blackguards, they're having big problems with their performance 'cause of big geometries, other problem is the Mono compiler. As long you stay to small geometries and easy shaders you won't have any problems. That's the reason there haven't been any big games with Unity.

    Thread Captain

    1380 Posts

Write post